Consortium

The Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa Consortium was funded by the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation (ESPA) programme. The ESPA programme is funded by the Department for International Development (DFID), the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and the Natural Environment Research Council. The Consortium comprised more than 30 researchers working in government-university/research institute country teams:…

Diseases

The Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa programme saw natural and social scientists working on four zoonotic diseases, each affected in different ways by ecosystem changes and having different impacts on people’s health, wellbeing and livelihoods. Lassa Fever Lassa fever is an often-fatal viral haemorrhagic illness endemic in West Africa, where up to 300,000 infections and…

Publications

September 2017 People, patches, and parasites: the case of trypanosomiasis in Zimbabwe, was published in the journal Human Ecology. Co-authors include DDDAC partners Ian Scoones, Vupenyu Dzingirai, Neil Anderson, William Shereni and Susan Welburn.   june 2017 A Special Theme Issue of the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, ‘One Health for a Changing World: zoonoses, ecosystems and human well-being’, showcases  work produced by the Drivers of Disease Consortium….

Multimedia

              Listen to Victor Galaz, co-lead of the Drivers of Disease political economy of knowledge and policy theme, and Assistant Professor at the Stockholm Resilience Centre, talking about disease scenarios and the launch of www.diseasescenarios.org   A short video, A Wider Wellbeing, explains what the Drivers of Disease consortium is researching, how…

PhD STUDENTSHIP ON ZOONOTIC DISEASE: APPLY NOW

The STEPS Centre is inviting expressions of interest in a doctoral studentship on the social dimensions of zoonotic disease in Africa. This 3+1 studentship starts in October 2012. The deadline for expressions of interest is 5pm on March 30, so get your applications in now! STEPS Zoonotic disease studentship: full details (pdf)

More epidemics resources

Our blogs on swine flu Ian Scoones on Responding to Pandemic Threats (April 2010) The lessons of swine flu: Ian Scoones, The Guardian, 10 May 2009. A longer version is available on our blog Blog: Ecology and infectious disease dynamics – from the forests of Sierra Leone by Melissa Leach, 6 April 2009 STEPS work…

NON-COMMUNICABLE DISEASES: AN INDICATOR OF GREATER SHIFTS

By Hayley MacGregor, STEPS Centre member The UN High-level Summit on Non-communicable Diseases now underway comes at an important moment for the development community. With just over 50 per cent of the world now living in cities, and with the percentage of the global population over 60 years of age expected to double by 2050,…

WHAT DOES “ONE HEALTH” MEAN?

STEPS Centre researcher Paul Forster is blogging from the International One Health Congress in Melbourne. This is his second and final post from the Congress. Three full days on from its start on Monday (adding up to 38 hours of hard conferencing plus a further 38 hours of parallel sessions), the 1st International One Health…

ONE HEALTH, ONE WORLD?

Photo: SARS Mural, from Steel Monkey’s Flickr photostream (creative commons)STEPS Centre researcher Paul Forster is blogging from the International One Health Congress in Melbourne. This is the first of his posts from the Congress. “Are you from the human side, or the animal side?” The question came from a doctor – an epidemiologist – from…

LESSONS IN “SCALING UP” HEALTH SERVICES FROM NIGERIA, CHINA & BRAZIL

What happens when you “scale up” health services to try to provide widespread coverage in a region or country? The “Beyond Scaling Up” panel at the Health Systems Research symposium last week posed this question. The speakers answered with success stories from Brazil, China and Nigeria; some cautionary tales from attempts to “scale up” that…