seeing pastoralism

Seeing Pastoralism – new online exhibition launched

A new online exhibition, Seeing Pastoralism, has been launched by the PASTRES project (Pastoralism, Uncertainty and Resilience: Global Lessons from the Margins). The website uses stories and images to explore how pastoralists understand, experience and respond to uncertainty. The stories are drawn from the six research sites of the PASTRES project. All six locations differ…

TAPESTRY events at the COP26 conference

The TAPESTRY project is hosting three side events at the COP26 conference in Glasgow, November 2021. Transforming Deserts, Deltas and Deconstructing Cities 7 November at 8:30-9:30 am South Asian Regional Resilience Hub Join Zoom event ‘From a fast-vanishing riverine landscape’: tales of uncertainty, resilience and transformation through visual stories and narratives 9 November 2021 at…

Contested Natures

‘Contested Natures’ conference programme now published

The conference programme is now published for ‘Contested Natures: Power, Possibility, Prefiguration‘, the third Biennial Conference of the Political Ecology Network (POLLEN). The conference takes place on 22-25 September 2020, and is the largest event of the STEPS Centre’s ‘Natures’ year. It is held online on a virtual platform: registration is required to attend. You…

New online exhibition: ‘Extracting Us’

The online exhibition ‘Extracting Us’ brings together different visions and responses to extractivism from feminist perspectives. The curators are keen to emphasise different ways of seeing, linking to further information and solidarity, and challenge conventional narratives and forms of representation. The exhibition is accompanied by a series of online conversations – details are on the…

A manifesto for models: New Nature Comment article

A new comment article in Nature by a group of authors, including STEPS co-director Andy Stirling (SPRU), takes the form of a ‘manifesto’ for responsible mathematical modelling. This relates to the theme of Uncertainty which cuts across various important projects and research agendas. The article aims to persuade those developing and using models to examine…

butterfly

IDS podcast: The Politics of Green Transformations

In this month’s edition of the Institute of Development Studies podcast, Between the Lines, IDS Director Melissa Leach, STEPS co-director Ian Scoones and Sussex professor Peter Newell discuss their co-edited book, The Politics of Green Transformations. Drawing on international examples, they reflect on past transformations as examples of positive change and examine the factors that…

POLLEN conference

Call for session proposals: Contested Natures – POLLEN conference 2020

The Political Ecology Network (POLLEN) Third Biennial Conference will be held in Brighton, United Kingdom on 24-26 June 2020 on the theme of Contested Natures: Power, Possibility, Prefiguration. The organisers have issued a call for proposals for themed sessions in a variety of both conventional and novel formats, aspiring to bring together perspectives and ways…

POLLEN conference

STEPS to host POLLEN2020 ‘Contested Natures’ conference

Political Ecology Network (POLLEN) Third Biennial Conference Contested Natures: Power, Possibility, Prefiguration Brighton, UK 24-26 June, 2020 #POLLEN20 We are happy to announce that the Political Ecology Network (POLLEN) Third Biennial Conference will be held in Brighton, United Kingdom on 24-26 June 2020 on the theme of Contested Natures: Power, Possibility, Prefiguration. POLLEN20 will be…

sunset over coastal pool

Uncertain Climate: new short film explores complex uncertainty in India

A new short film summarises key themes from the project Climate Change, Uncertainty and Transformation, which explored the myriad forms of uncertainty faced by the people at the forefront of climate change in three areas of India – dryland Kutch, the megacity of Mumbai and the island region of the Sundarbans. Amid striking images of…

A crowd of people walk through deep flooding in New Orleans

New journal ‘Nature and Space’ launched

The links between the environment and justice, past and present, are highlighted in a  new article, ‘The antinomies of nature and space’, co-authored by STEPS member Lyla Mehta. So-called ‘natural’ disasters, whether heatwaves, hurricanes, droughts or earthquakes, are linked in their impacts – and sometimes their causes – to patterns of injustice.  Poverty and inequality…