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About Saurabh Arora

Researcher

Saurabh Arora is Senior Lecturer in Technology and Innovation for Development at SPRU (Science Policy Research Unit), University of Sussex. Prior to joining SPRU in January 2014, he worked as an Assistant Professor at Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands. Saurabh completed his PhD in 2009 from Maastricht University, with a thesis focused on networked politics of knowledge sharing and agricultural innovation in and around a south Indian village. Prior to that, he was trained as an Engineer at University of Minnesota (USA) and National Institute of Technology, Surat (India).

All posts by Saurabh

Women working in a waterlogged field

What role does rural people’s agency play in finding pathways out of poverty?

by Saurabh Arora, Divya Sharma, M. Vijaybaskar, Ajit Menon and Joanes Atela This is the inaugural blog post for the project Relational Pathways: Mapping Agency and Poverty Dynamics through Green Revolutions. Based on extensive fieldwork in India and Kenya, we are developing a relational pathways approach, which posits poverty as a process rather than as…

Training with women farmers in Kenya

Where is the agency of farmers in Africa’s ‘new Green Revolution’?

by Joanes Atela, Charles Tonui, Dominic Glover and Saurabh Arora Hunger and food insecurity have continued to persist in sub-Saharan Africa. To address these problems, during the last decade there has been a renewed thrust for a ‘new Green Revolution’ in Africa. In popular discourse, the Green Revolution (GR) is associated with a technology-led transformation…

To struggle against and to build with: what does student activism in Delhi mean for pathways to justice?

At the weekend, Umar Khalid, one of the six student activists accused in Delhi’s ‘anti-nationalism scandal’ unfolded by the Hindu nationalist government of Prime Minister Modi, returned to the campus of Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU). In a rousing speech on Sunday night, he made a persuasive case for “anti-nationals of the world [to] unite”. Echoing…

Rethinking ‘smart’ in India: The city as an ecology of practices

Last week, the government of India announced the names of the first 20 cities slated to become ‘smart’. These are the winners of the recently concluded ‘Smart City Challenge’. The government claims that smartening the cities will make them inclusive and sustainable, through the adoption of ‘smart solutions’. In one city, plans include a digital…