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How can we reveal power and bias when synthesising evidence for policy?

In a letter published today in Nature, STEPS co-director Andy Stirling and Clive Mitchell (Scottish Natural Heritage) suggest that ‘open-mindedness’ is a key principle in making evidence synthesis more useful for policy. From pesticides to epidemics or obesity, there is often demand for analysis of a vast range of evidence to help inform decision-making and…

Celestial (policy) navigation

by Jim Sumberg, STEPS Centre research fellow The proposition that public policy should be ‘evidence-based’ is now widely accepted (although there is still considerable contestation around the meaning, nature, types, and qualities of evidence, the interpretation of evidence, the politics of evidence etc). The evidence in the phrase ‘evidence-based policy’ is often portrayed as evidence…

From MDGs to SDGs: aspirations, evidence and diversity in setting global goals

By Adrian Ely, STEPS Centre Head of Impact and Engagement This week’s STEPS Centre Annual Symposium will be looking at the tensions between scientific advice and policy-making across international borders.  I’ll be chairing a session on the Thursday morning that will hear the views of leading development experts on the role of aspirations, evidence and diversity…

The battle over evidence-based approaches to development

11-16-10 Evidence, from iampeas on Flickr (cc) If you haven’t already seen it, it’s worth looking at the debate over evidence-based approaches to development assistance that ran over three days on Duncan Green’s From Poverty to Power blog. In the first post, Rosalind Eyben and Chris Roche suggest that evidence based approaches, along with results…