African Farmer: a new online game

African Farmer, a free, open source online game, has been launched by the Future Agricultures Consortium and the University of Sussex. The game, conceived by a team including the STEPS Centre’s Agriculture convenor John Thompson, simulates the complex decisions and uncertainties faced by small-scale farmers living in Sub-Saharan Africa. It aims to challenge and engage…

Can Chinese innovation help address the climate crisis?

New research project explores lessons for ‘low carbon innovation’ from world’s biggest polluter A unique new UK-China project launches today, investigating the social and political drivers and implications of low-carbon innovation in China, the world’s largest carbon dioxide emitter by volume, rather than focusing on technical change alone. To mitigate climate change worldwide we need…

Woman walks along a water pipe in Dharavi

Access to Water in peri-urban India

A new article examining the increasing inequalities around water provision in Delhi by STEPS Centre partner Alankar is published this week. Socio-Spatial Situatedness and Access to Water (Economic & Political Weekly, October 12, 2013 vol xlviiI 54 no 41), looks at the social and political biases around large state-managed and institutionalised water provision in the city and the increasing gap…

Arguing about agronomy: the changing politics of agronomy research

A new article in Outlook on Agriculture explores how agronomy has been affected by social change since the 1970s. The science of agronomy informs crucial decisions on development. It is often seen as a practical, problem-solving field, but like other areas of study is affected by politics and power. The authors suggest a ‘political agronomy’ approach, which…

Land grabbing sign

Getting the facts right on land grabs: 5 new (free) articles

As part of its series on land grabs, The Journal of Peasant Studies has released a collection of 5 new articles on the problem of recording accurate and reliable information on global land deals. The edition includes a contribution from STEPS co-director Ian Scoones. Here’s the description from the JPS: “The recent ‘land rush’ precipitated…

Green grabbing

Press release: Green grabs: the dark side of the green economy

Green’ market initiatives are increasing poverty. Local ecosystem stewardship must be nurtured instead. ‘Green grabbing’ –  the rapidly-growing appropriation of land and resources in the name of ‘green ’ biofuels, carbon offsetting schemes, conservation efforts  and eco-tourism initiatives – is forcing people from their homelands and increasing poverty, new research has found. Ecosystems being ‘asset-stripped’…