Ebola in Guinea – people, patterns and puzzles

By Melissa Leach, Principal Investigator of Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa Consortium The francophone West African country of Guinea doesn’t often make international headlines, but has this week for the nastiest of reasons. An outbreak of Ebola, first identified in the forested south-east of the country in mid-March, has now spread across the country…

Controlling animal-to-human disease in Africa

African trypanosomiasis is a devastating disease, both for humans and animals. Over the last hundred years huge efforts have been made to control it. A working paper by Ian Scoones looks at the scientific and policy debates surrounding control of the disease and its vector, the tsetse fly, in Eastern and Southern Africa. The paper…

Living on the edge: Rethinking aid amidst complexity

By Melissa Leach, STEPS Centre director These days, a remarkably short and convenient flight takes one from Sussex UK –  where among other STEPS Centre activities this week I’ve been contributing to the post-2015 global sustainable development goals process and the international Future Earth Science Committee  – and Sierra Leone. Here, I’m on my way…

What multidisciplinary means: Nature doesn’t care about our building blocks

Rats in a maze, by ithinkx on Flickr (cc-by-nc-nd) The deeper you dig into most matters, the more complex things become. International development research is no different – and, given that it is people’s wellbeing that is the chief concern here, the imperative to pay due regard to such complexity is great indeed. Dr Gianni…

Press notice: Animal-to-human disease transmission: The science and poverty implications

As a new strain of SARS-like virus1 is reported to have been identified by UK officials and a major new popular science book Spillover – Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic by acclaimed US journalist David Quammen is published in the UK and US, zoonoses – diseases that pass from animals to humans –…

About Us

The Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa was a research programme designed to deliver much-needed, cutting-edge science on the relationships between ecosystems, zoonoses, health and wellbeing, with the objective of helping people move out of poverty and promoting social justice. It was funded from 2012 to 2016 by the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation  (ESPA) programme. Research focused on four…

Approach

The Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa programme brought together natural and social scientists, including environmental, biological, social, political, and human and animal health researchers. It was an integrated multidisciplinary – or One Health – approach to understanding animal-to-human (zoonotic) disease transmission. A main objective was to generate evidence and advance understandings of the complex relationships between…

People

The Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa team comprised: Neil Anderson Neil is a vet with a PhD in wildlife epidemiology. His research interests centre around the transmission of diseases at the wildlife/livestock/human interface and he has specialist expertise in the ecology of trypanosomiasis in wildlife populations. He is programme coordinator/lecturer at the Royal (Dick) Veterinary College, Edinburgh….

Consortium

The Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa Consortium was funded by the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation (ESPA) programme. The ESPA programme is funded by the Department for International Development (DFID), the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and the Natural Environment Research Council. The Consortium comprised more than 30 researchers working in government-university/research institute country teams:…

Diseases

The Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa programme saw natural and social scientists working on four zoonotic diseases, each affected in different ways by ecosystem changes and having different impacts on people’s health, wellbeing and livelihoods. Lassa Fever Lassa fever is an often-fatal viral haemorrhagic illness endemic in West Africa, where up to 300,000 infections and…