One Health: Science, politics and zoonotic disease in Africa

Book
  • Published 11/02/16
  • ISBN: 9781138961494

book coverZoonotic diseases – pathogens transmitted from animals to people – offer particularly challenging problems for global health institutions and actors given the complex socio-ecological dynamics at play. New forms of risk caused by unprecedented global connectivity and rapid social and environmental change demand new approaches. ‘One Health’ highlights the need for collaboration across sectors and disciplines to tackle zoonotic diseases. However, there has been little exploration of how social, political and economic contexts influence efforts to ‘do’ One Health.

This books fills this gap by offering a much-needed political economy analysis of zoonosis research and policy. Through ethnographic qualitative and quantitative data, the book draws together a diverse number of case studies. These include chapters exploring global narratives about One Health operationalisation and prevailing institutional bottlenecks; the evolution of research networks over time; and the histories and politics behind conflicting disease control approaches. The themes from these chapters are further contextualised and expanded upon through country-specific case studies – from Kenya, Zambia, Nigeria, Ghana and Sierra Leone – exploring the translation of One Health research and policy into the Africa context.

This book is a valuable resource for academic researchers, students and policy practitioners in the areas of global health, agriculture and development.

One Health: Science politics and zoonotic disease in Africa
Edited by Kevin Bardosh
Published by Routledge, in the Pathways to Sustainability series, February 2016
Price: £25.99 (softback); £85 (hardback)

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More about the book

Editor

Dr Kevin Bardosh is a member of the Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa Consortium and a Research Scholar at the Division of Infection and Pathway Medicine, University of Edinburgh, and the Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida. He currently runs an environmental health project in Haiti. He joins the Institute of Development Studies in spring/summer 2016 as a research fellow.

Contents

  1. Unpacking the Politics of Zoonosis Research and Policy Kevin Bardosh
  2. Global Narratives: The Political Economy of One Health Victor Galaz, Melissa Leach and Ian Scoones
  3. Knowledge Flows in One Health: The Evolution of Scientific Collaboration Networks Sophie Valeix, Christian Stein and Kevin Bardosh
  4. Contested Histories: Power and Politics in Trypanosomiasis Control Ian Scoones
  5. The Limits of Rapid Response: Ebola and Structural Violence in West Africa Kevin Bardosh, Melissa Leach and Annie Wilkinson
  6. Stepping Towards a Policy Response to Rift Valley Fever: Pastoralists and Epidemic Preparedness in Kenya Erik Millstone, Hannington Odame, Oscar Okumu and Kevin Bardosh
  7. Beyond Biosecurity: The Politics of Lassa Fever in Sierra Leone Annie Wilkinson
  8. Responding to Uncertainty: Bats and the Construction of Disease Risk in Ghana Linda Waldman, Audrey Gadzekpo and Hayley MacGregor
  9. Whose Knowledge Matters? Trypanosomiasis Policy-making in Zambia Catherine Grant, Neil Anderson and Noreen Machila
  10. Living Laboratories: The Politics of ‘Doing’ Brucellosis Research in Northern Nigeria Marie Ducrotoy, Anna Okello, Susan Welburn and Kevin Bardosh
  11. Imagined Futures: New Directions for One Health Kevin Bardoshvin Bardosh is a member of the Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa Consortium and a Research Scholar at the Division of Infection and Pathway Medicine, University of Edinburgh, and the Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida. He currently runs an environmental health project in Haiti. He takes up a Wellcome Fellowship at the Institute of Development Studies in spring/summer 2016.

Reviews

“In a captivating narrative, Bardosh and others broaden the horizon of One Health by exploring the political economy of emerging and endemic zoonotic disease research and policy development, and by bridging bio- and social science realms. A must read for all present and future One Health practitioners!”Katinka de Balogh, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Italy

“This book makes a significant contribution to the One Health movement by showing the added value of the social sciences in advancing closer cooperation between human and animal health in Africa. It nicely shows the need to understand both zoonoses and health as an outcome of complex social-ecological systems, and the importance of political analysis for lasting solutions.” – Jakob Zinsstag, Human and Animal Health Research Unit, Swiss TPH, Switzerland