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About Jeremy Allouche

Research Fellow

Jeremy Allouche is a research fellow based at the Institute of Development Studies. He has 14 years of experience in managing and designing projects in the fields of water governance, security and development, and international political economy analysis. He previously worked at the University of Oxford, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology - MIT, ETH Lausanne, the Swiss Graduate Institute of Public administration, and at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva. His work has mainly focused on global political analysis and is now leading a number of projects on West Africa and the Horn of Africa.

All posts by Jeremy

Water rationing in Taiwan and California is not the start of a ‘global water crisis’

Political leaders and international experts are discussing the future of water resources management at the 7th World Water Forum in Korea, a forum that meets every three years to raise public awareness about water issues. But public awareness about water issues may already be at its high since Taiwan and California have put in place…

Business for peace?

It is difficult to avoid being swept up in the current tide of optimism about Africa and resource development. For once, Africa is not only portrayed by outsiders as a continent of poor people suffering and fighting over civil wars and dependent on good will and aid. At the same time, the new, positive single…

Why are informal water services overlooked in post-conflict state building?

by Jeremy Allouche & Maria Cooper Resource politics is coming back to the forefront of academic and policy debates around peacebuilding. Environmental peace and state building agendas are dominated by questions concerning informality and hybridity in resources. What kind of role do service providers play in peacebuilding and state building and what can we learn…

World Water Day: Time to consider a low water economy

The theme of this year’s World Water Day on 22 March is ‘water and energy’ – giving a chance to reflect on how these two vital resources are linked. In the water sector, the food-energy-water nexus is slowly replacing the concept of Integrated Water Resources Management. The idea of the nexus essentially gained momentum in the…